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Airframe Ideas

Selkirk Installation
Author Last Post
Finally complete with interior: Selkirk panels, new headliner, new flooring and recovered leather seats.

Lost track of time to complete because there was so much to clean up "while we were there".  

Very pleased with the Selkirk product and their service/support: thanks Joni!

We used a product called Super Soundproof Mat for the flooring that we obtained from Aircraft Spruce.  It is smooth but very heavy duty.

I'm going to try to post some pics, but we'll see.

Jgreen
 

Attachment(s):
I have had the same the coin mat vinyl floor covering in my 185 for 15+ years. It wears like iron and is easy to clean.

Sent from my iPad

> On Aug 6, 2017, at 12:54 PM, Chuck (ctaylor@chucklesstores.com) <mailer@mail2.clubexpress.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
> JGG,
> All these work.http://sermat.aero/vinyl-flooring.html
> https://www.aircraftspruce.com/pages/ap/insulation/supersoundproofmat.php
> This is what I have in my 185;http://www.aipsource.com/loncoin.html
> CET
> Sent from my iPad
> On Aug 6, 2017, at 10:20 AM, John Green (johnggreen@cableone.net) <mailer@mail2.clubexpress.com> wrote:
>
> It is hard to believe that I started the installation of the Selkirk panels six months ago. The long time/delay was not the fault of the panels but a result of finding other issues to be addressed and not being able to find the time to work on the project over the last three months.. I have an IA putting the final touches on and doing another annual. There were also some unrelated "things" I wanted to accomplish that he has gotten done as well. It seems that we might be flying in about two more days of his labor.
>
> So, the Selkirk's are in place, new belts, new head liner, and newly upholstered seats. What I lack now is floor covering and I would prefer some hard rubber/plastic product rather than carpet.
>
> Any suggestions?
>
> Jgreen
>
>
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JGG,

All these work.

This is what I have in my 185;

CET
Sent from my iPad

On Aug 6, 2017, at 10:20 AM, John Green (johnggreen@cableone.net) <mailer@mail2.clubexpress.com> wrote:

It is hard to believe that I started the installation of the Selkirk panels six months ago.  The long time/delay was not the fault of the panels but a result of finding other issues to be addressed and not being able to find the time to work on the project over the last three months..  I have an IA putting the final touches on and doing another annual.  There were also some unrelated "things" I wanted to accomplish that he has gotten done as well.  It seems that we might be flying in about two more days of his labor.

So, the Selkirk's are in place, new belts, new head liner, and newly upholstered seats.  What I lack now is floor covering and I would prefer some hard rubber/plastic product rather than carpet.

Any suggestions?

Jgreen
 
I use a Diamond plate rubber mat from Alaska Rubber.  It comes in a light grey, which I have, and a black, which I feel will stain and look dirty as well as decrease the light in the cabin.  Alaska Rubber sells the rubber mat in the correct width to fit the 180/185, and then you just tell them how many inches long you want it.  We install it in the Beaver as well.  Alaska Rubber is in Anchorage, AK.  They are located at 5811 Old Seward Hwy, Anchorage, AK.  Their phone is: 907-562-2200.

Jim


On Aug 6, 2017, at 8:20 AM, John Green (johnggreen@cableone.net) <mailer@mail2.clubexpress.com> wrote:

It is hard to believe that I started the installation of the Selkirk panels six months ago.  The long time/delay was not the fault of the panels but a result of finding other issues to be addressed and not being able to find the time to work on the project over the last three months..  I have an IA putting the final touches on and doing another annual.  There were also some unrelated "things" I wanted to accomplish that he has gotten done as well.  It seems that we might be flying in about two more days of his labor.

So, the Selkirk's are in place, new belts, new head liner, and newly upholstered seats.  What I lack now is floor covering and I would prefer some hard rubber/plastic product rather than carpet.

Any suggestions?

Jgreen

 
It is hard to believe that I started the installation of the Selkirk panels six months ago.  The long time/delay was not the fault of the panels but a result of finding other issues to be addressed and not being able to find the time to work on the project over the last three months..  I have an IA putting the final touches on and doing another annual.  There were also some unrelated "things" I wanted to accomplish that he has gotten done as well.  It seems that we might be flying in about two more days of his labor.

So, the Selkirk's are in place, new belts, new head liner, and newly upholstered seats.  What I lack now is floor covering and I would prefer some hard rubber/plastic product rather than carpet.

Any suggestions?

Jgreen
 
I have quit trying to keep up with time and laughing at myself for even thinking it would be of value.  I spent over an hour yesterday removing the old screws and brackets for the overhead speaker.  Another 30 minutes figuring out the wiring to the overhead light module, neither of which will be replaced with "original" as they are completely outdated.

Again, I will have to comment on how poorly most "upgrades" are performed on airplanes, be it lighting, radios, antennas, interior, etc.  Even some work that I had done in removing an inop ADF, they just cut the coax and left it in place. A friend of mine refurbished a 195 a couple of years ago and the old, abandoned wiring he removed would have filled a ten gallon bucket.

The Selkirk panels are of excellent quality and the biggest challenges are the four front panels, kick panels and front door post (because of the air vents).

At any rate, my last few excursions into the work have been the removal of the headliner and overhead insulation and the reinstall of the insulation.  

In the end, I'm going to write up my experience and "what I learned" for anyone who wishers to take on a similar project with their airplane.


Jg
 
I was going to keep up with the time to install the Selkirk panels.  Then, I realized that you find all this old crap under the old upholstery that needs to be cleaned up as well.  Some of the previous wiring was a joke.  I'm still going to try to keep up with time, but a large part of it won't have anything to do with Selkirk's product.

I didn't/don't really have the time to do this myself, but I'm very glad I did.  At least I'll know what's under there. I'm biting the bullet and replacing the headliner as well.

Another benefit is that the panels after initial installation can probably be taken off and reinstalled in less than an hour for any upgrades or maintenance.

Jgreen
 
I haven't had much time to work on the panels until yesterday.  I'm fitting the panels in to about 90%, but not doing the final sanding/fitting until things start "coming together".  The left windshield post was/is a challenge.  The wiring, pitot tubing, and fuel line going up it had been haphazardly modified over the years and it took quite a bit of rearranging with multiple splices and reruns to get everything to fit.  Fortunately, a hangar neighbor has recently rewired his 195 and had all the tools, wiring, and knowledge to do it right.

Installing the Selkirk panels in a "clean" airframe would be easy, well easier.  At one time a "new" interior was installed using the old panels and when everything came off, it was just a mess.  As far as the panels, a Dremel tool, a table top band saw, and a table top belt sander make the fitting a breeze.

I have realized that the time to replace the headliner is now, so I'm going to incorporate that into this project as well.  Fortunately, I have a "traveling" airplane so being without the 180 for a month or two won't inconvenience me much.

I'm going to narrow the back seat as shown in the 337 sent by Selkirk and send them off for reupholstery.  The farther I go into this, the happier I am that I'm doing the Selkirk and doing it myself.  It gives me the chance to clean up lots of old, bad work.

I'm taking pics and will try to post as I go along.

Jg
 
Well, I got the panels in and started the install Sunday.  Like I said, I have done Plane Plastics before so I'm not a complete novice.  After getting the seats out and stripping the old kick panels, I started on the right kick panel.  It took about 2 hours but some of that was a learning curve about what worked best with the fiberglass.  I also got the right side windshield door post almost finished.  Cutting that hole for the air vent is a ******.  Selkirk had marked the spot though and that helped.

What I have learned so far is:
The Dremel tool works well for sanding, like finishing out the hole for the air vent and small touch ups.
The Dremel tool is not up to anything but small cuts.  Overloads pretty easily.
The belt sander goes through the fiberglass like hot butter; quick but be careful.
Rough cuts are best made with a small, table mounted band saw.  I have a small table mounted jig saw that works but the up and down motion shakes the material badly.  Band saw is best. I had to order blades with smaller/more teeth per inch.

I'm goin to keep up with the hours for the install in detail and will post them here with pictures.

Jgreen
 
Measure several times and patience helps a lot.  I used a Dremel tool which really made the installation manageable.  I would definitely recommending purchasing one for the install.
 
. . . measure and fit 3X times before cutting, sanding and drilling. . .!!
 
I used the sander to the largest degree and an X-acto knife.

Sent by Lilly and Rylan's Campa

On Feb 8, 2017, at 3:03 AM, John Green (johnggreen@cableone.net) <mailer@mail2.clubexpress.com> wrote:

Oh, those dividers.  Good idea.  Can you make all the fits with sanding or will rough cutting be necessary?  If so, what tool will cut the fiberglass without breaking it?  Dremel tool?
 
I installed a selkirk interior last summer it was fairly easy take your time. All I used for trimming tools was a narrow belt sander , and a die grinder with a zip disk 
 
Oh, those dividers.  Good idea.  Can you make all the fits with sanding or will rough cutting be necessary?  If so, what tool will cut the fiberglass without breaking it?  Dremel tool?
 
 
Randy,

I have the belt sander.  What do you mean by dividers?

Jg
 
Go slow. Have a little, narrow belt sander, and small set of dividers handy.

Randy

Sent by Lilly and Rylan's Campa

On Feb 7, 2017, at 6:14 AM, John Green (johnggreen@cableone.net) <mailer@mail2.clubexpress.com> wrote:

I just ordered the Selkirk interior for my 1970 180.  I have installed Plane Plastics parts in a Skylane so I have some experience, but wondered if any of you fellows might have installed the Selkirk panels.  I know I have to narrow the rear seat and have a copy of the 337 for that.

Also, I ordered a new headliner.  Is there any value to installing the headliner first or does it make any difference?

Any tips, suggestions, tools used etc.?

John Green
 
I just ordered the Selkirk interior for my 1970 180.  I have installed Plane Plastics parts in a Skylane so I have some experience, but wondered if any of you fellows might have installed the Selkirk panels.  I know I have to narrow the rear seat and have a copy of the 337 for that.

Also, I ordered a new headliner.  Is there any value to installing the headliner first or does it make any difference?

Any tips, suggestions, tools used etc.?

John Green
 
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