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Purchase Tips

High Time Airframe
Author Last Post
Thanks. It's helpful to knowing where to look for corrosion and damage.  
 
I just saw this thread & believe I can add something to it.In 1983 my dad found me a high time 185(1970 with 9771 hours on it) that had spent all it's life on floats on the west coast(salt water) & had quite the damage history.It had a mid time engine so dad being the ame took a good look at it.It looked straight & after inspection he told me that it would be ok to fly for a few years but would need either work to be done in a few years,or to get rid of it.
I took it flying & it flew straight & performed well so I bought it - at the ripe old age of 23.After 9 years of use I had station 90 front half replaced & all the belly skins,although I ended up having to sue because of the shoddy work,I kept the plane & still own & fly it today.
I didn't spend the $134,000 required (all at once)for the new 185,but I probably have spent that amount over my almost 33 years of ownership.
My only maintenance problems seem to happen when the aircraft sits for long periods without usage,I've flown ifr across Canada to the maritimes & back twice without any snags at all.
A proper inspection before purchase - such places as down low in front of the doors for buckling( common on rough treated floatplanes),cracks to the wing skins(above & below tanks & struts),seat rails & floor,station 90 for corrosion( under the floor), horizontal stab on the leading edge ( ribs for cracks due to mishandling) ; vertical stab attach points for corrosion & cracking; the hockey sticks on each side for wear & cracking;tailwheel & stinger for wear & cracks( include the stinger mount for cracks).
 
Daryl
 

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I'm having a steep learning curve having bought a 5500hrs '55 C180: look for badly executed repair jobs on the plane. Mostly from ground loops. Especially remove all covers in the tail, check for bent sheet metal. Second have the gear checked and the adjacent structures. These are really costly items. 

Richard Bieber, Munich

Am 29.06.2016 um 06:24 schrieb Michael Riordan (jiggsranch@icloud.com) <mailer@mail2.clubexpress.com>:

Thanks.  I certainly believe in a pre-buy inspection.  Having worked air taxi I have seen the frequent inspections required by commercial operations.  I'm wondering what issues might be common in high time airframes.  I know about wear in the trim system.  
 
Thanks.  I certainly believe in a pre-buy inspection.  Having worked air taxi I have seen the frequent inspections required by commercial operations.  I'm wondering what issues might be common in high time airframes.  I know about wear in the trim system.  
 

When I started looking for a 180 back in 1997 I thought a low time non-commercial airplane was the way to go. But I was of course a newbie and very naïve on such things as buying a Cessna 180.  I did know however based on my research that I wanted a pre 1963 Cessna 180 because they have the smaller airframe. But I also knew I did not want a 1953/54 error model because the airframe was a bit smaller and the engine was only 225 HP.

 

I hired an AME here in Canada to help me with my selection. One of the most important myths he corrected me on was that low time private airplanes are better than high time commercial airplanes. The reason being is that commercial airplanes have to be maintained all of the time whereas the privately owned airplanes are flown on average less than 10 hours per year and very poorly maintained on average.

 

So I purchased a 5,000 hour previously commercial airplane that was owned by four private airplane owners after the commercial times. What was also important was the AME knew the airplane and had all of its history for 30 years.

 

My advice is to hire a mechanic who knows a lot about the airplane and then do your homework to investigate the history of the airplane you are considering. Then absolutely have a 100 hour inspection done.

 

My initial conception was that privately owned low time airplanes were a better purchase than high time commercial airplanes but I learned that this is not always the case. The 100 hour inspection by a qualified mechanic that has a history of working with Cessna 180/185 aircraft is your best insurance policy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: mailer@mail2.clubexpress.com [mailto:mailer@mail2.clubexpress.com]
Sent: June-28-16 10:30 PM
To: Purchase Tips
Subject: High Time Airframe <<$151502637972$>>

 

Are there any comments or watch outs when looking at a mid 70's with 10K hours on airframe.  Low time engine.  Tail feathers rebuilt already.

 
Are there any comments or watch outs when looking at a mid 70's with 10K hours on airframe.  Low time engine.  Tail feathers rebuilt already.
 
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