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Mechanics and Maintenance Shops

Lubricating the h-Stab Jack Screw
Author Last Post
Hi David,
I have both, but the lower, bottom inspection plate is the one that i am talking about, as it provides direct entry to the jackscrew assembly, but, as you say, it is a one-handed job.  The side inspection plates, are just forward of the bulkhead, so they don’t provide direct access to the jackscrew.  Even with my, size: XL, hands, I am able to remove the jackscrew and reinstall it, slowly, with one hand.  Not an easy task, but it is doable. 

Jim
N2393C
54’ 180


On May 19, 2016, at 8:41 PM, David Lloyd (skywagon@charter.net) <mailer@mail2.clubexpress.com> wrote:

Jim,
Is your 180 "plate" the single bottom type or the upper double side plates.
If the bottom version, that is a one-handed, one tool entry is it not. . ??
That sounds difficult. . .
D
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, May 19, 2016 7:59 PM
Subject: re: Lubricating the h-Stab Jack Screw <<$149176396116$>>

I have that inspection plate installed on my 54’ 180, and had to use it to remove the jackscrew and take apart, clean, lube, and reinstall.  It works.
Jim Hill
N2393C
54’180


On May 19, 2016, at 7:17 PM, Jean-Pierre Held (heldjp@gmail.com) <mailer@mail2.clubexpress.com> wrote:

A 180K happen to be in for a jack screw problem at my maintenance shop. There is apparently a service bulletin from Cessna in which you add an additional inspection plate in the tail below the jack screw. This allows you better access and removal of both jack screws for maintenance.


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Jim,
Is your 180 "plate" the single bottom type or the upper double side plates.
If the bottom version, that is a one-handed, one tool entry is it not. . ??
That sounds difficult. . .
D
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, May 19, 2016 7:59 PM
Subject: re: Lubricating the h-Stab Jack Screw <<$149176396116$>>

I have that inspection plate installed on my 54’ 180, and had to use it to remove the jackscrew and take apart, clean, lube, and reinstall.  It works.
Jim Hill
N2393C
54’180


On May 19, 2016, at 7:17 PM, Jean-Pierre Held (heldjp@gmail.com) <mailer@mail2.clubexpress.com> wrote:

A 180K happen to be in for a jack screw problem at my maintenance shop. There is apparently a service bulletin from Cessna in which you add an additional inspection plate in the tail below the jack screw. This allows you better access and removal of both jack screws for maintenance.


Virus-free. www.avast.com
 
I have that inspection plate installed on my 54’ 180, and had to use it to remove the jackscrew and take apart, clean, lube, and reinstall.  It works.
Jim Hill
N2393C
54’180


On May 19, 2016, at 7:17 PM, Jean-Pierre Held (heldjp@gmail.com) <mailer@mail2.clubexpress.com> wrote:

A 180K happen to be in for a jack screw problem at my maintenance shop. There is apparently a service bulletin from Cessna in which you add an additional inspection plate in the tail below the jack screw. This allows you better access and removal of both jack screws for maintenance.

 
A 180K happen to be in for a jack screw problem at my maintenance shop. There is apparently a service bulletin from Cessna in which you add an additional inspection plate in the tail below the jack screw. This allows you better access and removal of both jack screws for maintenance.
 
I would concur with Captain Lloyd.  Years ago, I was heavily loaded and ready for a long flight from Lake Hood's gravel strip in Anchorage.  I taxied out and prior to taking the runway, attempted to adjust my trim.  The trim wheel would not move, up or down.  It had never been an issue before.  Rather than take the problem with me on the flight, I taxied back to my parking spot, and upon investigation, concluded that I was going nowhere, fast.  I pulled my Service Manual and started reading.  Not too good, what I read, as it tells you to pretty much pull the tail apart to gain access to the jack screw assembly.  Being someone that always thinks there may be a better way of doing things, I opened the inspection panel below the jack screw assembly, and discovered that there was just enough room to get my hand inside, so the process of un-bolting and removing the assembly began to take place, as winter weather also began to set in at Lake Hood, with its associated wind.
Long story, short, is that you can remove it that way, and once outside, I found that when I removed the leather boot, the lube inside the boot was dried and pretty much hard.  Careful cleaning revealed that I still had a good jack screw assembly, so I used the recommended lube and as David said, massaged it in, and thus also lubed the leather.
Reassembly wasn't as easy as removal (seems that it never is though), and getting it properly rigged, with only one hand up, blindly feeling my way around, was difficult, but once rigged and installed, it worked just fine.  I now follow Davids advice and use a needle tip on my grease gun to lube the assembly, in place, and it does just fine.

Jim Hill
N2393C
54'180
 
Hi Rich,
 
If I understand what you are describing, here is my take on it.
The "jack" screw assemblies should be lubed from time to time, and here is how I do mine.
My jack screw assemblies are contained in a "leather sock" affair.
Remove the side trim piece on the tail to get at the jacks.
I used an exacto knife and put a tiny vertical slit in the top of the sock.
I run my pitch trim all the way in one direction that extends to the jack assembly to its max. length
Then I squirt in a shot good marine type lube into the slit and hand squeeze the sock doing what I think is working the new lube into the jack parts that I can feel. . .
This also keeps the "sock" flexible so it does not dry out and crack open letting dirt, etc. enter.
Dave
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 6:03 AM
Subject: Lubricating the h-Stab Jack Screw <<$145478561019$>>

Looks like this would require removal of the h-stab and pretty much rebuilding the assembly.  Can anyone confirm that Cessna planned for lubing at assembly only?  
 
Richard

No threats detected. www.avast.com
 
Looks like this would require removal of the h-stab and pretty much rebuilding the assembly.  Can anyone confirm that Cessna planned for lubing at assembly only?  
 
Richard
 
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