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Operation Tips

Techniques for spreading ashes?
Author Last Post
I usually just use a paper grocery bag, sized depending on volume of ashes. Lunch sacks are usually big enough.

Makes a nice burst cloud that can be seen from the ground if spectators are watching and not too far away.
 
Are we talking about a paper grocery bag or something with thinner ply eg sandwich bag?

Thanks!
Derek
 
construct an ash spreading gun.  It's like a potato gun only without the pyro.  Four feet of PVC 2" pipe, a gate valve, and into a 4" PVC chamber.   Chamber about 18" long and drill a vent hole in the cap .  Load the chamber with ashes, put tape over vent, close gate valve, step to the aircraft.  Have a helper in the back seat.  Open the baggage door and stick the "barrel" out and down.  Remove vent tape and say last "rites", then open the gate valve.  DUN, done !    
 
The way I have done it was to put the ashes in a brown paper bag and tie a loop around the bag with about 10' of 550# parachute cord tied off to a cargo tiedown. Slow the plane, open the window and throw the bag down. The bag rips when it hits the end of the cord releasing the ashes well away from the open window. It takes no equipment and the relative can throw the bag themself if you choose to let them go with you in the plane, your call.
 
Best way to spread ashes is to roll the ashes in a small towel and toss the towel out the window...no blow back into the cabin and no sand blasting of the stabilizer.



From: "Dstone (stonemtn737@aol.com)" <mailer@mail2.clubexpress.com>
To: Operation Tips <OperationTips@skywagons.club>
Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2016 9:42 AM
Subject: re: Techniques for spreading ashes? <<$160890678873$>>




Had a passenger once try to empty a bag of ashes out the 185 window over Denali.  You have to tightly hold the opening of the bag with your hand near the aft side of the window and let the low air pressure suck it out (which she didn't do).

Unfortunately the pour soul ended up in a Hoover vacuum bag for eternity...


 
Had a passenger once try to empty a bag of ashes out the 185 window over Denali.  You have to tightly hold the opening of the bag with your hand near the aft side of the window and let the low air pressure suck it out (which she didn't do).
Unfortunately the pour soul ended up in a Hoover vacuum bag for eternity...
 
Both techniques described here will work. I used a 4'' PVC tube about 5 ft long and it barely held all the ash. I used a Maule with double struts and took surgical tubing to lash the tube to the struts about 3/4 of the distance out from fuselage to wing. If you try to dump too close to the fuselage the departed will stay with you due to low pressure in cabin! I attached a flapper valve used in a toilet to each end of the 4'' PVC and attached a length of rope to each flapper. Secured the flappers with duct tape to avoid a premature launch. Ran the two ropes in through passenger window. Flew to the burial site and slowed down to 60 Knots and had a friend of mine deploy by pulling the back flapper first and then the front one. We were over water at the request of the departed just at sunset with family watching from the shore. Ashes came out in one long stream with sunset in the background.

I made a couple of trial runs to test the rig with flour to make sure things worked as planned .

DonMc
 
I used some 4" ABS pipe. Glued a cap on one end and screwed a sash handle on it to grip the tube. Make it about 36" long. Place the ashes in the tube and then mold some cut grocery bag over the open end. Put a stout rubber band over the paper to secure it to the tube. Put a string under the band and run it up the tube and secure it to the capped end with another rubber band.

Slide the tube out the open window about 12-24 inches, pointed roughly down. Pull on the string to release the lower rubber band. Ashes fall out. Reusable system, used mine a few times. A little rudder on your side will make a bit of a vacuum on your side to pull the ashes away. I made the rudder mistake (tail rotor) on a Jet Ranger once and it looked like that scene on the "Big Lebowski" inside the helo.
 
Start with a sturdy paper grocery bag. Put the ashes in the bag (add camelia petals or rose petals, if desired). Duct tape the bag closed. Cut about 4 or 5 slits about 4 inches long in the shoulders of the bag. Tie sturdy cord to the seat bottom and tie the other end to the bag. Make sure the cord is long enough to nearly reach the horizontal tail, but not long enough to get caught in the tailwheel (don't ask me how I know). At the appropriate time and at 70 or 80 knots open the door and toss out the bag. Retrieve the cord after the drop. A copilot is a great help!
 
I believe this has been discussed but cannot find any posts via search. I've been asked to help with a friend's final journey and know that there are pitfalls to just using the window. Any helpful ideas?
 
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